Why Posture Matters When You Sing

Most of us have heard that we should have good posture when we sing. But is posture really that important? And what is good posture for singing anyways?

For many, good posture is something they hear about but they do not pay too much attention to it when they sing. Either because they think it is not that important or because there are so many other things to pay attention to (singing on pitch, starting at the right time, breathing… the list of things to worry about is long i know!).

Posture IS important when you sing and having bad posture can affect your voice negatively. In this blog post I am going to teach you how to have great posture when you sing and tell you, why singing with great posture is so beneficial.

The Benefit of Singing with Good Posture

As with everything we geek out on in this blog, the goal of good posture is to make you sound great when you sing. When you have good posture your body is aligned so that you are able to control your breath support and your voice is able to ring out freely. We will cover the kinks of how bad posture effects your voice but first let’s establish good posture so that you know how that feels.

 

The Most Beneficial Posture For Singers: The Checklist

To establish good posture, follow the steps in this checklist:

Posture-for-Singers

You should now look like I do in this pinterest pin.

Posture for Singers Infographic

 

I want to make sure that you know this posture is not a rigid position that you have to stand in at all times when you sing. Rather, think of it as a “home position” that you can always return to when you sing if you feel yourself running out of breath or straining your voice.

2 Ways Bad Posture Could be Hurting Your Singing

Great posture helps you become a singing machine by letting all the elements in sound production work together. If your body is not aligned their will be kinks in the sound production especially your breath support and your ability to create free vibration with your voice. Let’s look at what to avoid.

 

The Lower Body Posture Mistake that hurts your Singing Breathing

To use breathing for singing your diaphragm has to be able to move freely and bad posture can prevent that. A swayback constricts the free movement of your diaphragm as well as slouching.

The most common mistake I see with my students is that they keep their balance on their heels. When you keep your body balance on your heels your stomach muscles are active and this tightens your stomach so that your diaphragm is not free to move.

To understand how your stomach muscles tighten, when you balance on your heels, try this exercise:

  1. Learn forward so thet you feel your body’s weight on the forefront of your feet.
  2. Relax your stomach, and place a hand on your abdomen by your solar plexus.
  3. Now shift the weight of your body to the heels of your feet.

Did you feel your stomach muscles tighten? When your stomach muscles tighten like this it is hard to create the expansion around your middle that singing breathing requires.

Related: How To Breathe When You Sing

 

The Upper Body Posture Mistake that Strains your Voice

Your voice can create sounds freely when it is aligned with your body and you relax the muscles around your vocal folds.

The biggest posture mistake I see that constricts the voice of my students is when they tilt their head back to reach their high notes and tilts it down to sing low notes. Tilting your head with the pitches your are singing engages the muscles around your vocal folds which makes them unable to move freely.

To stop tilting your head when you sing; Simply place your hand on your head to feel when your head is moving. Another way to check it is also to film yourselves and look at the places in your song when you do it (hint it is usually on those crazy high belting notes).

To sing high notes correctly, hold your head steady with your gaze level in front of you and drop your jaw down on those high notes to make room in your mouth for them. To practice your jaw posture check out this post: 1 Tip for Proper Jaw Posture when Singing

 

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